Bazar circumstance

Well, we didn’t do much more with our full day in Cox’s Bazar, mainly as there’s not a lot to do! After popping the last deluge of posts on, we got a rickshaw to the Blue Ocean hotel. This was where we’d arranged to meet Mr Chowdhury, the chap we’d met on the bus.

Our rickshaw driver got really arsey when we tried to give him 50Tk for a 20Tk ride – he was demanding the usual 200Tk from us. He went so far as to park up and follow us halfway to the hotel shouting “Howareyou?! Howareyou?!” after us. Obviously, his English was limited to a few phrases without knowing what they meant.

We met Ekramul in reception and he invited us in for a drink before lunch where we were introduced to two of his business partners. We sat and chatted for a while, but had to leave before lunch as Hans and I were both feeling lousy. Having a cold really sucks. This was a shame as it was really nice to be invited to lunch in a strange country by someone we’d only just met – but this seems typical of the welcome we’ve come to expect in Bangladesh.

Instead, we wandered back to our hotel and laid down for an hour or so partly snoozing, partly channel hopping. Later in the afternoon, we took a walk to the Angel Drop restaurant which is mentioned in Lonely Planet. Unfortunately, we caught them on their break between lunch and dinner but did have the most delicious cup of lemon tea ever. Well worth the 10Tk each.

For a late lunch, we returned to the little restaurant where we’d had dinner the night before and then walked back to the hotel. Then went back to the restaurant a couple of hours later for some more food. Then back to the hotel to watch the footie, which we couldn’t as the power was out again.

And that was pretty much our day. Cox’s Bazar isn’t Goa by any stretch, although from what Ekramul and his friend were telling us it could just be a matter of time. The government have been buying up tracts of land along the coast for development into tourist-friendly resorts. The coastline along here is 200km after all.

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